#1

 

The following definitions are taken from the Basic Catechism by Mary Lea Hill, FSP and Susan Helen Wallace, FSP - published by Pauline Books and Media

 

 

 

1.  Virtue - is a power to do good or a habit of doing good.  The main virtues are the theological (God-centered) virtues and the cardinal (hinge or key) virtues.

 

2.  Cardinal virtues - The cardinal virtues are the key moral virtues:  prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance. The word "cardinal" comes from the Latin word for "hinge". The other moral virtues hinge on these four.

 

3.  Prudence - is the virtue which enables us to think carefully before acting, to make wise choices, and to do things well.

 

4.  Justice - is the virtue which enables us to give God and neighbor their due, thus safeguarding the rights of God and others.

 

5.  Fortitude - is the virtue by which we do what is good and right in spite of any difficulty.

 

6.  Temperance - is the virtue by which we exercise self-control with regard to  the drives of human nature.

 

7.  Other moral virtues are:   religion, patriotism, obedience, truthfulness, liberality, patience, humility, chastity and there are many more.

 

8.  Theological virtues - the theological virtues are faith, hope and love.  God gives them to us so we might direct out whole life to Him.

 

9.  Theological - means that which pertains to God.

 

10.  Faith - is the supernatural virtue by which we believe all that God has revealed and teaches us through the Catholic Church, because He cannot be deceive or be deceived.  By faith we commit ourselves to God.

 

11.  Hope - is the supernatural virtue by which we trust that God will give us eternal life and all we need to obtain it, because He is merciful and faithful to His promises.

 

12.  Love - is the supernatural virtue by which we love God above all, and love all other people as ourselves for the love of God.

 

 

 

#2

 

The following is taken from the text book Catholic Morality by Ronald Wilkins and Mary Gryczka, Brown-Roa Publishers.

 

 

 

The following are some of the virtues which are often misunderstood.

 

 

 

Piety - It is acting toward God in a manner worthy of God.

 

Meekness - patience under injury or insult.  It is mildness of temper and forbearance during attacks on one's self, one's diginity, or one's integrity.  It is not fear or cowardice; it is control in moments of stress brought on by others.

 

Humility - the recognition of one's true worth, including one's limitations and weakness.  It is the recognition of one's place in relation to others and the expression of that place in word and action.  It is simply not putting oneself froward, boasting, looking fro recognition or honor, or seeking honors or power for oneself.  It is honesty about oneself.

 

Forgiveness - a virtue which leads us to pardon others easily and readily without resentment or reserve.  It is generally prompted by the recognition of the worth and dignity of others, the acceptance of their weaknesses, and the desire for reconciliation and peace.

 

Modesty - observing proprieties in speech, dress, and behavior, especially with regard to sex.  It is the opposite of being showy or boastful.  It is a quiet reserve based on what it means to be truely human.  It is a virtue which expresses our personal confidence in ourselves based on an inner sense of worth and dignity.  It is not prudishness or shame.  It is humility in word and action.

 

Virginity - a state or way of life in whcih sexual abstinence is a total commitment.  It is a condition or way of life prior to or without sexual expression.  It is a freely chosen withholding of sexual intimacy for reasons based on the nature and meaning of sexual intercourse, the dignity and worth of human sexual life, and the meaning and purpose of marriage.  It is not based on fear of human sexual intimacy, fear of pregnancy, fear of discovery, shame or ignorance.  Virginity is both an attitude of heart and the practice of sexual abstinence.

 

Chastity - a virtue which directs our sexual behavior in and out of marriage.  Within marriage, it is the direction of our sexual actions to thier proper end, in which case properly motivated mutual sexual action is an act of virtue.  Outside of marriage, it is the virtue which directs the control of our sexual drives in the form of sexual abstinence and leads us to a respect for the sexual drives of others.

 

Self-respect - a virtue that, stemming from a good self-image, prevents a person from doing "borderline" things in dress, action, and language which are not in keeping with good taste.  It directs a person to be polite, courteous, and considerate of others in language and action, not simply to be well thought of, but because such actions are right and proper in themselves.

 

Questions

 

1.  Do you think that the virtues in this list are "misunderstood virtues"? Explain

 

2.  Why are they described as misunderstood?

 

3.  What did you learn from this list of virtues?

 

 

 

following definitions are taken from the Basic Catechism by Mary Lea Hill, FSP and Susan Helen Wallace, FSP - published by Pauline Books and Media

 

 

 

 

The following is taken from the text book Catholic Morality by Ronald Wilkins and Mary Gryczka, Brown-Roa Publishers.

 

 

Definitions